The How To Guide for Podcasting Homilies

I’ve seen lots of blog posts and articles advocating podcasting your church’s homilies.  Unfortunately, unless your quite geeky, this can prove to be a daunting task.  Its actually rather simple, If you know the technologies pieces and how they go together.  I ran across this article from the Catholic Diocese of Sacramento describing in technical detail how do just that.  If you’ve ever thought about trying to podcast some homilies, read this article to get started.

It’s written by Carson Weber from the Sacramento Diocese who has one of the the coolest titles a Catholic techie could possible hope for, Associate Director for New Media Evangelization.  I’ve often maintained that the church will get to the place we need to be with technology and social media when every church has its own Internet Ministry.  We’re not there yet, but Carson in his role is putting us one step closer.  Well done!

Carson’s article will provide you the mechanics of how to get started with podcasting and I’ll add a little bit of advice.   Signing up to do this weekly may prove overwhelming.  Unfortunately, the Internet is filled with half-completed and abondoned projects of well-intentioned, passionate volunteers.  Remember, at the same time, you’re trying to get this technical routine down, you have the task of building awareness and listenership (is that a word?) to your podcasts.  Start recording them every week for practice, but only publish a few.  Let’s say the ‘best of’ if your willing to make that judgement.  Infrequent but stellar content will draw a larger audience than frequent but less-than-steller content.  You’re in the this for long haul, don’t let the spark die by working too hard trying to keep up.  Best of luck and God bless!

 

 

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Author:Joe Luedtke

Joe Luedtke is the Chief Operating Officer for Liturgical Publications (LPi). Joe specializes in Social Media and Web 2.0 and is currently leading LPi’s efforts to move into the on-line world. Joe works for the world's largest and oldest social network, religion, and believes that this social network could benefit tremendously from the the proper use of Internet technologies.